Jupiter and the moon will ‘kiss’ on Valentine’s Day… here is how YOU can see it

  • A crescent moon and Jupiter will ‘kiss’ in the sky on Valentine’s Day 
  • The pair will be visible about one hour after sunset worldwide
  • READ MORE:  Jupiter and a ‘half’ moon joined up in the sky last year

There will be a cosmic kiss on Valentine’s Day when the moon and Jupiter appear to meet in the night sky.

NASA said the ‘cute couple’ will sit in the southwestern skies about one hour after sunset Wednesday evening.

The crescent moon and gas giant will seem about a few finger widths apart – but will be about 227 million miles away from each other.

The conjunction will be visible to the naked eye and viewing it with binoculars will put the moon and Jupiter on the same field of view.

The event is not rare, but it happening on Valentine’s Day is a unique occurrence. 

According to astrology, the two cosmic objects meeting in the night sky represent growth, abundance, healing and good fortune. 

NASA said the 'cute couple' will sit in the southwestern skies about one hour after sunset Wednesday evening. Pictured is the moon and Jupiter meeting over Turkey in 2019

NASA said the ‘cute couple’ will sit in the southwestern skies about one hour after sunset Wednesday evening. Pictured is the moon and Jupiter meeting over Turkey in 2019

While the pair will meet shortly after sunset, they will be at their closest at 1:05am ET.

About 13 percent of the lunar surface will shine tonight as the waxing crescent moon rises in the night sky. 

To spot Jupiter, look toward the bottom curve and then southwest – the brightest ‘star’ will be the gas giant.

While conjunction will be visible worldwide, they will appear closer over Singapore and Australia due to an optical illusion that makes our natural satellite appear larger near the horizon than it does higher up in the sky.

According to astrology, the two cosmic objects meeting in the night sky represent growth, abundance, healing and good fortune.

The conjunction will be visible to the naked eye and viewing it with binoculars will put the moon and Jupiter on the same field of view. Pictured is the conjunction in 2019

The conjunction will be visible to the naked eye and viewing it with binoculars will put the moon and Jupiter on the same field of view. Pictured is the conjunction in 2019

The constellation of Aries will also shine brightly as it sits northeast of the crescent moon.

Aries is one of the 12 constellations of the zodiac, and it is located in the northern celestial hemisphere.

It is often associated with the astrological sign of Aries, which is the first sign of the zodiac and is depicted as a ram.

However, Aries will still be outshined by Jupiter as it is the brightest ‘star’ in the night sky.

The gas giant is 365 million miles away when it is closest to Earth and 601 million miles at its farthest point.

Jupiter will be a little over 480 million miles from our planet Thursday evening.

The last time the moon met the gas giant on December 26, 2023.

The 10-day-old moon was 86 percent illuminated during the close approach, which was the final full moon of the year. 

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